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Creative Writing Ideas for High School

Deriving Creative Spirits in High School

❶She decided to use mirrors to teach the reflective process.

Group Creative Writing Exercises

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It is important for students to be assigned tricky tasks which would make them think, therefore, writing prompts should sometimes be challenging and even controversial. If essay writing is still complicated task for you, check out our cheap essay writing services. Indeed, ideas can be very interesting and even some of them unusual. In my opinion, need to start with writing prompts that are more related to the individual personally.

It will be much easier to write in details about a topic which is closer to the particular student. It would be interesting to read what people write about "Imagine you woke up and found that you are invisible? As for me, if you do not have good writing skills and you are fond of mathematic, even all of these creative writing prompts will not help you to cope with writing tasks.

It is just my opinion! I agree that these writing prompts can help students to improve their thinking and creativity, as I see that all these prompts have deep meaning.

But I cannot understand how these prompts can develop writing skills? Authenticity in Writing Prompts. Mark Farrington, college instructor and teacher-consultant with the Northern Virginia Writing Project , believes teaching revision sometimes means practicing techniques of revision. An exercise like "find a place other than the first sentence where this essay might begin" is valuable because it shows student writers the possibilities that exist in writing.

In his college fiction writing class, Farrington asks students to choose a spot in the story where the main character does something that is crucial to the rest of the story.

At that moment, Farrington says, they must make the character do the exact opposite. Bernadette Lambert, teacher-consultant with the Kennesaw Mountain Writing Project Georgia , wondered what would happen if she had her sixth-grade students pair with an adult family member to read a book. She asked the students about the kinds of books they wanted to read mysteries, adventure, ghost stories and the adults about the kinds of books they wanted to read with the young people character-building values, multiculturalism, no ghost stories.

Using these suggestions for direction, Lambert developed a list of 30 books. From this list, each student-adult pair chose one. They committed themselves to read and discuss the book and write separate reviews. Most of the students, says Lambert, were proud to share a piece of writing done by their adult reading buddy.

Several admitted that they had never before had this level of intellectual conversation with an adult family member. Suzanne Linebarger, a co-director of the Northern California Writing Project , recognized that one element lacking from many of her students' stories was tension.

One day, in front of the class, she demonstrated tension with a rubber band. Looped over her finger, the rubber band merely dangled. It's the tension, the potential energy, that rivets your attention. It's the same in writing.

Linebarger revised a generic writing prompt to add an element of tension. The initial prompt read, "Think of a friend who is special to you. Write about something your friend has done for you, you have done for your friend, or you have done together. Linebarger didn't want responses that settled for "my best friend was really good to me," so "during the rewrite session we talked about how hard it is to stay friends when met with a challenge.

Students talked about times they had let their friends down or times their friends had let them down, and how they had managed to stay friends in spite of their problems.

In other words, we talked about some tense situations that found their way into their writing. Moving From Fluency to Flair. Ray Skjelbred, middle school teacher at Marin Country Day School, wants his seventh grade students to listen to language. He wants to begin to train their ears by asking them to make lists of wonderful sounding words. They may use their own words, borrow from other contributors, add other words as necessary, and change word forms.

Among the words on one student's list: Grammar, Poetry, and Creative Language. Kathleen O'Shaughnessy, co-director of the National Writing Project of Acadiana Louisiana , asks her middle school students to respond to each others' writing on Post-it Notes. Students attach their comments to a piece of writing under consideration. While I was reading your piece, I felt like I was riding a roller coaster. It started out kinda slow, but you could tell there was something exciting coming up.

But then it moved real fast and stopped all of a sudden. I almost needed to read it again the way you ride a roller coaster over again because it goes too fast. Says O'Shaughnessy, "This response is certainly more useful to the writer than the usual 'I think you could, like, add some more details, you know?

Anna Collins Trest, director of the South Mississippi Writing Project , finds she can lead upper elementary school students to better understand the concept of "reflection" if she anchors the discussion in the concrete and helps students establish categories for their reflective responses. She decided to use mirrors to teach the reflective process. Each student had one. As the students gazed at their own reflections, she asked this question: Trest talked with students about the categories and invited them to give personal examples of each.

Then she asked them to look in the mirrors again, reflect on their images, and write. One of his strategies has been to take his seventh-graders on a "preposition walk" around the school campus.

Walking in pairs, they tell each other what they are doing:. I walk among my students prompting answers," Ireland explains.

Kim Stafford, director of the Oregon Writing Project at Lewis and Clark College , wants his students to discard old notions that sentences should be a certain length. He explains to his students that a writer's command of long and short sentences makes for a "more pliable" writing repertoire. He describes the exercise he uses to help students experiment with sentence length.

Just use 'and' when you have to, or a dash, or make a list, and keep it going. Stafford compares the first style of sentence construction to a river and the second to a drum.

Joni Chancer, teacher-consultant of the South Coast Writing Project California , has paid a lot of attention to the type of questions she wants her upper elementary students to consider as they re-examine their writing, reflecting on pieces they may make part of their portfolios.

Here are some of the questions:. Why did I write this piece? Where did I get my ideas? Who is the audience and how did it affect this piece? What skills did I work on in this piece? Was this piece easy or difficult to write? What parts did I rework? What were my revisions? Did I try something new? What elements of writer's craft enhanced my story?

What might I change? Did something I read influence my writing? What did I learn or what did I expect the reader to learn? Where will I go from here? Will I publish it? Chancer cautions that these questions should not be considered a "reflection checklist," rather they are questions that seem to be addressed frequently when writers tell the story of a particular piece. Nancy Lilly, co-director of the Greater New Orleans Writing Project , wanted her fourth and fifth grade students to breathe life into their nonfiction writing.

She thought the student who wrote this paragraph could do better:. The jaguar is the biggest and strongest cat in the rainforest.

The jaguar's jaw is strong enough to crush a turtle's shell. Jaguars also have very powerful legs for leaping from branch to branch to chase prey. Building on an idea from Stephanie Harvey Nonfiction Matters , Stenhouse, Lilly introduced the concept of "nouns as stuff" and verbs as "what stuff does. In a brainstorming session related to the students' study of the rain forest, the class supplied the following assistance to the writer:.

Group Creative Writing Exercises These exercises can be used in the classroom, at writing groups or in workshops, or you can use them if you want to practice creative writing with your friends. Round Robin In small groups of 3 or 4, each person starts a story and gets minutes to write. One Sentence Story This exercise is the same concept as Round Robin, except that each person only writes a sentence at a time. Writing Correlation Start off with each student providing a short but detailed description of a person or place.

List Stories Each person in the group creates a list of 15 elements that must be included in a story; character names, certain vocabulary, specific objects, certain phrases or lines of dialogue, locations, etc. Fill-in-the-Blanks Sit in a group, and have every person say their full sentence. Nothing justifies the existence of… Age is composed of… The whole world belongs to… Love disguises itself as… Wouldn't it be beautiful to… Small invisible things are… Today the sun is made of… The poem I'll never write begins… Individual Creative Writing Exercises The exercises below can help you practice and expand your creative writing skills while working on your own.

Letters to the Past Write a letter to yourself at a specific point in your past. Found First Lines Listen for interesting conversations happening in the world, and write them down.

Name that Emotion Write about an emotion without ever using the name of the feeling itself, or synonyms for it. Coloring a Story Write a story inspired by shades of a single color. Interviews with Characters Imagine your character is being interviewed.

Learn More About Creative Writing While writing prompts are a good way to explore creative writing, learning the fundamentals of the different genres is essential to honing your writing craft. Choose from these options, to name a few: Earning College Credit Did you know… We have over college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 1, colleges and universities.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page Transferring credit to the school of your choice Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Browse Articles By Category Browse an area of study or degree level. Certification and Career Roadmap. You are viewing lesson Lesson 21 in chapter 19 of the course:. Middle School Language Arts Middle School Language Arts: Education Level All All. Drama, Theater, and Film.

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Creative Writing, Page 3 Make Beliefs Comix Students create comic strips online. This tool is great for prewriting, responding to reading, creative writing, vocabulary words, ESL, and tickets out.

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I was lucky to have had great creative writing teachers when I was in high school. They were very passionate about literature, and because of them I continued to pursue creative writing. Those teachers also impacted me because of the great creative writing activities they used to allow the. Creative Writing Opportunities for High School Students. February 11, If your school does not have a creative writing club, it is easy to start one. writing club can also be an important accountability tool for students who are working on independent creative writing projects. If you’re writing a longer piece or even a novel, or.

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30 Ideas for Teaching Writing. Summary: Few sources available today offer writing teachers such succinct, practice-based help—which is one reason why 30 Ideas for Teaching Writing was the winner of the Association of Education Publishers Distinguished Achievement Award for . Group Creative Writing Exercises. These exercises can be used in the classroom, at writing groups or in workshops, or you can use them if you want to practice creative writing with your friends.