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Omnivore Shore a recovered vegetarian takes on two practicing vegetarians over who should eat what and why. The Benefits and Risks of Raw Milk Host Randy Shore welcomes raw milk activist Jackie Ingram and farmer Alice Jongerden of Home on the Range Dairy.

Do the health benefits of raw milk outweigh the potential risks.

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This area includes material on quoting and paraphrasing your research sources, as well as material on how to avoid plagiarism. APA Style. These OWL resources will help you learn how to use the American Psychological Association (APA) citation and format style. This section contains resources on in-text citation and the References page, as well as APA sample papers, slide presentations, and the APA .

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Citing References in the Body (Intro and Discussion) of the Paper Throughout the body of your paper (primarily the Intro and Discussion), whenever you refer to outside sources of information, you must cite the sources from which you drew information.

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Use bibliography software to help keep track of and cite sources. Several such programs are available, and can save a lot of time and energy. Consider taking a class on writing a research paper. Feb 24,  · References: When providing references in research paper you must inform the readers about the sources you used to cite this information. The reference page is known as the "Works Cited". The reference page is known as the "Works Cited".

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Please see our Sample APA Paper resource to see an example of an APA paper. You may also visit our Additional Resources page for more examples of APA papers. How to Cite the Purdue OWL in APA. Individual Resources. The page template for the new OWL site does not include contributors' names or the page's last edited date. Citing a source means that you show, within the body of your text, that you took words, ideas, figures, images, etc. from another place. Citations are a short way to uniquely identify a published work (e.g. book, article, chapter, web site). They are found in bibliographies and reference lists and are also collected in article and book databases.