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How to Write a Proposal Essay/Paper

Step 1: Choose a topic

❶You can utilize literary tools such as metaphors, similes, personification and descriptive adjectives.

Before You Start: Pre-Writing Strategies

English Composition and Essay Writing
What is a Proposal Essay?
Scholarships, Financial Aid, Student Loans and Colleges

Your thesis statement needs to be debatable. In fact, many thesis statements are structured as the answer to a well-formulated question about the topic. We don't need you to prove that to us. A good thesis guides the essay. In your thesis, you can sometimes preview the points you'll make in your paper, guiding yourself and the reader: Some teachers teach the "rule of five" or the "five paragraph format" for writing compositions.

This isn't a hard and fast rule, and you don't need to hold yourself to an arbitrary number like "5," but it can be helpful in building your argument and organizing your thoughts to try to aim for at least 3 different supporting points to use to hold up your main argument. These 3 points will all be addressed as a part of your thesis statement.

Some teachers like their students to come up with: Introduction, in which the topic is described, the issue or problem is summarized, and your argument is presented Main point paragraph 1, in which you make and support your first supporting argument Main point paragraph 2, in which you make and support your second supporting argument Main point paragraph 3, in which you make and support your final supporting argument Conclusion paragraph, in which you summarize your argument.

Back up your main points with two kinds of evidence. In a good composition, your thesis is like a tabletop--it needs to be held up with the table-legs of good points and evidence, because it can't just float there all by itself.

Each point you're going to make should be held up by two kinds of evidence: Proof includes specific quotes from the book you're writing about, or specific facts about the topic. If you want to talk about Mercutio's temperamental character, you'll need to quote from him, set the scene, and describe him in detail. This is proof that you'll also need to unpack with logic. Logic refers to your rationale and your reasoning. Why is Mercutio like this?

What are we supposed to notice about the way he talks? Explain your proof to the reader by using logic and you'll have a solid argument with strong evidence. Think of questions that need to be answered. A common complaint from student writers is that they can't think of anything else to say about a particular topic. Learn to ask yourself questions that the reader might ask to give yourself more material by answering those questions in your draft.

How is Juliet's death presented to us? How do the other characters react? How is the reader supposed to feel? Why does Shakespeare kill her? Why not let her live?

Why does she have to die? Why would the story not work without her death? Don't worry about "sounding smart. Making a strong argument has much less to do with your wording and your vocabulary and more to do with the construction of your argument and with supporting your thesis with main points. Only use words and phrases that you have a good command over. Get some feedback on your rough draft. It can be tempting to want to call it quits as soon as you get the page count or the word count finished, but you'll be much better off if you let the paper sit for a while and return to it with fresh eyes and be willing to make changes and get the draft revised into a finished product.

Try writing a rough draft the weekend before it's due, and giving it to your teacher for comments several days before the due date. Take the feedback into consideration and make the necessary changes. Be willing to make big cuts and big changes. Many students think that revising is about fixing spelling errors and typos, and while that's certainly a part of proofreading, it's important to know that NO writer writes a perfect argument with flawless organization and construction on their first run-through.

You've got more work to do. Moving paragraphs around to get the best possible organization of points, the best "flow" Delete whole sentences that are repetitive or that don't work Removing any points that don't support your argument.

Go from general to specific. One of the best ways you can improve a draft in revision is by picking on your points that are too general and making them much more specific.

This might involve adding more supporting evidence in the form of quotations or logic, it might involve rethinking the point entirely and shifting the focus, and it might involve looking for entirely new points and new evidence that supports your thesis. Think of each main point you're making like a mountain in a mountain range that you're flying over in a helicopter.

You can stay above them and fly over them quickly, pointing out their features from far away and giving us a quick flyover tour, or you can drop us down in between them and show us up close, so we see the mountain goats and the rocks and the waterfalls. Which would be a better tour? Read over your draft out loud. One of the best ways to pick on yourself and see if your writing holds up is to sit with your paper in front of you and read it aloud.

Does it sound "right"? Circle anything that needs to be more specific, anything that needs to be reworded or needs to be more clear. When you're through, go right back through and make the additions you need to make to get the best possible draft. Proofread as the last step of the process.

Don't worry about commas and apostrophes until you're almost ready to turn the draft in. Sentence-level issues, spelling, and typos are called "late concerns," meaning that you should only worry about them when the more important parts of your composition--your thesis, your main points, and the organization of your argument--are already as good as they can be. Find out what is the main point of having the police, find out what they do and you should be able to get an idea of what to write.

Not Helpful 16 Helpful Read often and write down words you do not understand. Look them up to build your vocabulary. Not Helpful 23 Helpful The first paragraph should be the introduction and it should contain a brief outline of the subjects you will touch on. Analyze how your essay flows. Does each sentence lead smoothly to the next? Does each paragraph flow logically to the next? Although you can analyze your essay by reading through it, it's helpful to make a reverse outline, working from your essay to outline your thoughts.

When events happen in sequence: I first started to realize that I was in the minority when I was in middle school My realization was confirmed when I proceeded to high school. If sentences elaborate on each other: Plants need water to survive A plant's ability to absorb water depends on the nutrition of the soil.

When an idea contrasts with another idea: Vegetarians argue that land is unnecessarily wasted by feeding animals to be eaten as food Opponents argue that land being used for grazing would not be able to be used to create any other kind of food. If you're relaying a cause and effect relationship: I will be the first person in my family to graduate from college I am inspired to continue my family's progress through the generations.

When connecting similar ideas: Organic food is thought to be better for the environment. Cut information that's not specifically related to your topic. You don't want your essay to ramble off-topic. Any information that doesn't directly or indirectly support your thesis should be cut out.

Have someone read your paper aloud to you. Your ears are sometimes better than your eyes at picking up mistakes in language. The essay should sound like it has a good flow and understandable words. As an alternative, you can record yourself reading it aloud and play it back. Rewrite any problematic body passages.

If needed, rearrange sentences and paragraphs into a different order. Make sure that both your conclusion and introduction match the changes that you make to the body.

Compose your essay with a clear purpose. A persuasive essay is designed to sway the reader to adopt your point of view about a topic. This means it's important that your views are expressed in a clear, concise manner, which allows the reader to understand your argument. These are good examples of persuasive essay topics you might write about: Whether governments should or should not fund embryonic stem cell research. Whether love is a virtue or a vice. Why Citizen Kane is the best movie of the 20th century.

Why American citizens should be forced to vote. Write your essay as though you are conducting a debate. When you speak in a debate, you introduce your topic, list your evidence and draw a conclusion for the people who are listening. A persuasive essay has a similar structure. Collect facts from good sources to justify your opinions. Support your argument with reasoned facts. A well-written essay is great, but a well-argued essay is undeniable.

In addition to doing research, you can perform empirical experiments including taking surveys, doing interviews or conducting experiments. Survey results or interviews could be great pieces of information to start your essay with. Tell a story about the facts. Don't just list the facts; tell a story! How would you like to be one of those wrongfully-convicted inmates? Present the other side of your argument and use logic and facts to show why the other side's opinion is either inaccurate or not up-to-date.

You're showing the reader you are unbiased and considered the other arguments, but you concluded that your argument is the best. Time after time, evidence has disproved this theory. The death penalty, in fact, does not act as a deterrent to crime: Tie all your ideas together in a gripping conclusion. Be sure to stress your thesis, or what you are arguing for or against, one last time.

Use some of the information you have discussed, or a story you've saved, to color your conclusion a little bit. Choose a subject for your essay. You'll be investigating a topic and presenting your viewpoint about the topic based on evidence. Research papers usually fall under this category of writing. For example, you could write an expository essay arguing that embryonic stem cell research can lead to cures for spinal cord injuries and illnesses like Parkinson's or diabetes.

Expository essays differ from persuasive essays because you aren't stating an opinion. You're stating facts that you can back up with research. Select your strategy and structure. Some common strategies and structures for expository writing include: Definition essays explain the meaning of terms or concepts. Classification essays organize a topic into groups starting with the most general group and narrowing down to more specific groups.

In this type of essay, you'll describe either the similarities and differences or both between ideas or concepts. These essays explain how topics affect each other and how they are interdependent.

How-to essays explain the steps required for completing a task or a procedure with the goal of instructing the reader. Keep your views unbiased.

Expository essays aren't about opinions. They are about drawing a conclusion based on verifiable evidence. You might even find that, with new information, you'll have to revise your essay. If you started out writing about the scarcity of information regarding global warming, but came across a bunch of scientific evidence supporting global warming, you at least have to consider revising what your essay is about.

Use the facts to tell the story. The facts will tell the story itself if you let them. Think like a journalist when writing an expository essay. If you put down all the facts like a reporter, the story should tell itself.

Don't mess with structure in expository essays. In narrative essays, you can twist and turn the structure to make the essay more interesting. Be sure that your structure in expository essays is very linear, making it easier to connect the dots. Tell your story vividly and accurately. A narrative essay recounts an incident that either you or others have experienced.

In a narrative essay, you could describe a personal experience in which embryonic stem cell research could have helped you or someone you love conquer a debilitating condition. Include all of the elements of good storytelling.

You'll need an introduction, setting, plot, characters, climax and conclusion. How are you going to set the story up?

Is there something useful or important here that gets mentioned later on? Where the action takes place. What does it look like? Which words can you use to make the reader feel like they are there when they read it? The meat of the story, the essential action. Why is the story worth telling? Who's in the story. What does the story tell us about the characters?

What do the characters tell us about the story? The suspenseful bit before anything is resolved. Are we left hanging on the edges of our seat? Do we need to know what happens next? What does the story mean in the end? How have things, people, ideas changed now that the end is revealed? Have a clear point of view. Most narrative essays are written from the author's point of view, but you can also consider other perspectives as long as your point of view is consistent.

Utilize the pronoun "I" if you are the narrator. In a narrative essay, you can use first person. However, make sure that you don't overdo it. In all essays, you sound more authoritative if you state facts or opinions in third person. You're telling a story, but the purpose of the story is to make a specific point. Introduce your main idea in your thesis statement, and make sure that all of your story elements tie back to your thesis statement.

What did you learn? How is your essay an exploration of the things that you learned? How have you changed? How is the "you" that started the essay different from the "you" now?

Related to, but different from, the "what did you learn? Choose your language carefully. You will use words to evoke emotions in your reader, so choose your words deliberately. Essay Help Essay Template. Sample Tess of the d'Urbervilles Essay. Start with a great fact, story, or compelling idea, then grow from there. If you're stuck, many writers save their intro until the end, once they know the actual direction and evidence in the rest of the essay.

Not Helpful 27 Helpful Next, write each of your supporting ideas in sentence format, but leave three or four lines in between each point to come back and give detailed examples to back up your position. Fill in these spaces with relative information that will help link smaller ideas together. Now that you have developed your thesis and the overall body of your essay, you must write an introduction. Begin with an attention grabber. You can use shocking information, dialogue, a story, a quote, or a simple summary of your topic.

Whichever angle you choose, make sure that it ties in with your thesis statement, which will be included as the last sentence of your introduction. The conclusion brings closure of the topic and sums up your overall ideas while providing a final perspective on your topic. Your conclusion should consist of three to five strong sentences.

Simply review your main points and provide reinforcement of your thesis. After writing your conclusion, you might think that you have completed your essay. Before you consider this a finished work, you must pay attention to all the small details.

Check the order of your paragraphs. Your strongest points should be the first and last paragraphs within the body, with the others falling in the middle. Also, make sure that your paragraph order makes sense. If your essay is describing a process, such as how to make a great chocolate cake, make sure that your paragraphs fall in the correct order.

Review the instructions for your essay, if applicable. Many teachers and scholarship forms follow different formats, and you must double check instructions to ensure that your essay is in the desired format. Finally, review what you have written.

Reread your paper and check to see if it makes sense. Make sure that sentence flow is smooth and add phrases to help connect thoughts or ideas.

Check your essay for grammar and spelling mistakes. Every semester, Fastweb helps thousands of students pay for school by matching them to scholarships, grants, and internships, for which they actually qualify. Join today to get matched to scholarships or internships for you!

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Writing a Research Paper This page lists some of the stages involved in writing a library-based research paper. Although this list suggests that there is a simple, linear process to writing such a paper, the actual process of writing a research paper is often a messy and recursive one, so please use this outline as a flexible guide.

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Writing an academic essay means fashioning a coherent set of ideas into an argument. Because essays are essentially linear—they offer one idea at a time—they must present their ideas in the order that makes most sense to a reader. Successfully structuring an essay means attending to a reader's logic.

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How To Write a Composition. Use These Tips to Improve Your Writing Skills essay writing, it is easier to write about what you believe in. Write this in 'first person' -- When writing papers that are personal narratives, write in first person. Dec 19,  · A proposal essay is exactly what it sounds like: it proposes an idea and provides evidence intended to convince the reader why that idea is a good or bad one. Although proposals are generally a significant part of business and economic transactions, they are not limited to those two areas. Proposals Reviews:

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How to Write a Good Introduction. Posted on March 31, September 27, by Corrine Pratt. Since the dawn of man, writing has been used to communicate ideas. In academic settings, ideas are typically communicated using formal types of writing such as essays. Are you writing an essay about Maya Angelou? An anecdote about her . Jun 11,  · How To Write Good English Compositions And Essays. Updated on June 11, myvenn. more. write an essay discussing at least three major factors responsible for this and suggest ways of dealing with the problem”. The above is a typical example of an English Language paper composition or filefreevd.tks: