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Sarcastic but Fun Essay Topics

❶Does it help you really get to know the writer?

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2018-19 Common App Essays
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Instead of writing that the other guy asked him to unlock the van, Stephen has the guy actually say his own words in a way that sounds like a teenager talking. They could also mean any number of things—violence, abandonment, poverty, mental instability. Obviously, knowing how to clean burning oil is not high on the list of things every 9-year-old needs to know. To emphasize this, Stephen uses sarcasm by bringing up a situation that is clearly over-the-top: The humor also feels relaxed.

This helps keep the tone meaningful and serious rather than flippant. There's been an oil spill! This connection of past experience to current maturity and self-knowledge is a key element in all successful personal essays. Even the best essays aren't perfect, and even the world's greatest writers will tell you that writing is never "finished"—just "due.

But using too many of these ready-made expressions runs the risk of clouding out your own voice and replacing it with something expected and boring. Stephen's first example breaking into the van in Laredo is a great illustration of being resourceful in an unexpected situation.

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I have always loved riding in cars. After a long day in first grade, I used to fall asleep to the engine purring in my mother's Honda Odyssey, even though it was only a 5-minute drive home.

As I grew, and graduated into the shotgun seat, it became natural and enjoyable to look out the window. Seeing my world passing by through that smudged glass, I would daydream what I could do with it.

In elementary school, I already knew my career path: I was going to be Emperor of the World. While I sat in the car and watched the miles pass by, I developed the plan for my empire. I reasoned that, for the world to run smoothly, it would have to look presentable.

I would assign people, aptly named Fixer-Uppers, to fix everything that needed fixing. That old man down the street with chipping paint on his house would have a fresh coat in no time.

The boy who accidentally tossed his Frisbee onto the roof of the school would get it back. The big pothole on Elm Street that my mother managed to hit every single day on the way to school would be filled-in. It made perfect sense! All the people that didn't have a job could be Fixer-Uppers. I was like a ten-year-old FDR. Seven years down the road, I still take a second glance at the sidewalk cracks and think of my Fixer-Uppers, but now I'm doing so from the driver's seat. As much as I would enjoy it, I now accept that I won't become Emperor of the World, and that the Fixer-Uppers will have to remain in my car ride imaginings.

I always pictured a Fixer-Upper as a smiling man in an orange T-Shirt. Maybe instead, a Fixer-Upper could be a tall girl with a deep love for Yankee Candles. Maybe it could be me. Bridget the Fixer-Upper will be slightly different than the imaginary one who paints houses and fetches Frisbees. I was lucky enough to discover what I am passionate about when I was a freshman in high school.

On my first day, I learned that it was for developmentally-disabled students. To be honest, I was really nervous. I hadn't had too much interaction with special needs students before, and wasn't sure how to handle myself around them. Long story short, I got hooked. Three years have passed helping out in APE and eventually becoming a teacher in the Applied Behavior Analysis summer program. I love working with the students and watching them progress.

When senior year arrived, college meetings began, and my counselor asked me what I wanted to do for a career, I didn't say Emperor of the World. Instead, I told him I wanted to become a board-certified behavior analyst. A BCBA helps develop learning plans for students with autism and other disabilities. Basically, I would get to do what I love for the rest of my life. He laughed and told me that it was a nice change that a seventeen-year-old knew so specifically what she wanted to do.

I smiled, thanked him, and left. But it occurred to me that, while my desired occupation was decided, my true goal in life was still to become a Fixer-Upper. I'll do one thing during the day, then spend my off-hours helping people where I can. Instead of flying like Sue, though, I'll opt for a nice performance automobile. My childhood self would appreciate that.

Bridget takes a somewhat different approach than Stephen, but her essay is just as detailed and engaging. Let's go through some of the strengths of her essay.

The essay is arranged chronologically. Bridget starts each paragraph with a clear signpost of where we are in time:. I wanted to become a board-certified behavior analyst. It helps that the metaphor is a very clear one: Every childhood Fixer-Upper ever.

Ask your parents to explain the back row to you. This essay uses many techniques that make Bridget sound genuine and make the reader feel like we already know her.

The second technique is the way Bridget coins her own terms, carrying them through the whole essay. It would be easy enough to simply describe the people she imagined in childhood as helpers or assistants, and to simply say that as a child she wanted to rule the world. The third technique is to use sentences of varying length, syntax, and structure. Most of the essay's written in standard English and uses grammatically correct sentences. However, at key moments, Bridget emphasizes that the reader needs to sit up and pay attention by switching to short, colloquial, differently punctuated, and sometimes fragmented sentences.

The last key moment that gets the small-sentence treatment is the emotional crux of the essay. We partner with colleges to bring high quality programs online, at half the cost. Students prepare for applying to selective colleges by taking rigorous courses , participating in extracurricular activities , studying for standardized tests , and more.

All of this preparation, however, can distract attention from one of the most notorious sections of the college application: The essay is both the most and the least visible part of the competitive admissions process. The point of evaluating all these factors is to enable colleges to holistically build a well-rounded class of specialists.

The essay or essays is a great way to learn more about an applicant, her motivations, life experiences, and how she can contribute to the campus community. The essay is important because it gives students the chance to showcase their writing and tell the college something new. It also allows admissions officers to learn more about students and gain insight into their experiences that other parts of the application do not provide.

Over colleges and universities use the Common Application , which has one required essay, called the personal statement. There are five new prompts to choose from, and this essay can be used for multiple colleges. Beyond the Common Application essay, many colleges also have supplements that ask additional, university-specific questions which applicants must respond to with shorter-form essays.

While topics vary from supplement to supplement, there are a few standard essay formats that many colleges use:. This is the most common essay and is used for the main Common Application essay. In this essay, the applicant talks about a meaningful life experience that helped shape who she is today. To provide a better website experience, owlcation. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: Here are some sample statements from college students that you can argue for or against: Divorce destroys family life. There shouldn't be a minimum age to drive a car. God is undoubtedly real. A college education is worth the cost. Students don't understand how important it is to have privacy on social media.

You aren't defined by your past. Helping others should be an important life principle. College students should be grateful to their family for the opportunity to go to college. Social pressures are greater on students today than in the past. Faith is an essential part of life. You should marry a person with the same educational level as you. Friends are more important than family. Sports should not be the center of family holidays. Gun registration is a good idea. Universities should set an example by recycling as much as possible.

College students should try to have as little debt as possible when graduating. Working while in college is something everyone ought to do. Everyone should be trained in emergency medical care, like CPR. We should be careful about judging people based on appearance. Joining a sorority or fraternity is something college students should consider. Communism is still something we need to worry about. Penalties for drunk driving need to be increased.

Schools are giving students too many standardized tests. Universities should require every student to take a foreign language. Fine Arts education in music, art, and theater should be expanded.

Divorce is not always the result of failed love. Internet use by children should be censored. People have a right to not have to breathe second-hand smoke. Boxing is a dehumanizing sport. The penalty for drunk driving should be jail time. Standardized tests are poor reflections of students' abilities. Celebrities should be allowed to live private lives. Athletes get paid too much for what they do. Private schools are better than public schools.

Homeschooling does not prepare students for college. Student athletes should not get special treatment in college classes. Husbands should make more money than wives.

Pornography should be banned. America is overly sensitive about racial issues. Grades do not measure how smart you are. Schools should move toward all electronic textbooks. In 50 years, there will be no more use for paper books. China will soon overtake the U.

Being a stay-at-home dad is demeaning for men. Caffeine is bad for you. Child support should include paying for college. People should read more books.

Skateboards or hoverboards or bikes should be banned at my school. Online education is as good as a standard college education. Giving Tuesday is something more people should support.

News media is biased. Ballots with no paper trail should be banned. Representation of women in video games needs to change.

Pick an Audience to Convince. Your audience is other students in your college. Write a letter to the school newspaper: Is conversation becoming non-existent in this age of technology? Is technology negatively affecting our ability to form deep connections with other people? You are talking to parents of students in elementary through high school: How important are sports in a student's life?

Argue for or against why parents should spend the time, energy, and money to get their children involved in sports. Address an audience of incoming high school freshmen: What sort of sport is best for students at your school? Talk to incoming college freshmen: How important is it for college students to keep in contact with their parents?

How should they contact their parents and how often? What sort of information do they need to share with their parents? Are there some things parents don't need to know?

Address the faculty at your college: Should college classes that are taken by large numbers of students have a standardized curriculum with the same books, tests, and assignments? Or should each professor teach the class in their own way? You are a newspaper reporter writing an editorial for a major paper: Why don't women make the same amount as men for the same work? Argue for or against the idea that women should make equal money for equal work. Write an article addressed to parents in a magazine that focuses on parenting and family life: How important is family life for children?

Do parents have an obligation to give their children a certain kind of family life? If so, what kind? How can we help children get the type of family life they deserve? Feminists often argue that girls and boys should be raised exactly the same. What do you think? Argue whether or not you would raise your children with exactly the same sorts of toys, discipline, and activity choices.

Should boys and girls be raised exactly the same? If not, what sorts of differences do they need? Imagine that some people in your hometown are proposing to change to same-sex schooling.

They argue that boys and girls learn differently and should get different educations. Write an editorial for or against the idea of instituting same-sex schooling. What are the benefits? Are there better alternative methods? Imagine you are soon to become a parent. Write a letter about your own philosophy of parenting.

How important is it to raise children with strict guidelines? Argue for or against strict parenting. If you are against it, explain how you would discipline children. You are the head coach at a high school and you have heard that budget cuts may cause a decrease in funding for athletics. Argue for the importance of athletics to students in high school. You are an elementary school teacher and you have been informed that all your students will get an iPad next year. Argue for or against whether this technology will be helpful in your classroom.

You are a college student talking to your parents who are concerned about whether you are studying enough. Argue for a balance between social life and school. How important is it for children to have two parents? Address a couple that is about to divorce and explain how their relationship decisions will affect their children. Addressing the people in charge of food at your college, argue for what can be done to make the food choices healthier.

What can be done to help students avoid the "Freshman 15? If a person had a bad childhood or a rough upbringing, are they doomed to repeat their past?

If not, why not? Argue how an individual can overcome their past, and how other people or institutions can help them. Americans today are less healthy than they were in the past.

Not only is there an obesity epidemic, but Americans are less fit. A recent study says that school-age children are 90 seconds slower in running a mile than their parents were at that age. How can a college help its graduates to be fit for life?

Argue for three things your college needs to do in order to help students to be healthy now and to make healthy lifestyle choices in the future. Your audience is parents of college students or your parents. Argue for the value of social life and being involved in school activities.

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Interesting Personal Essay Ideas. A personal essay gives the reader a glimpse of your personal life experience. A lot of times you may need to compose a personal essay. It could be for a simple class assignment, or the requirement for a college application. In order to gain ideas of writing a personal essay, you can get inspired by the listed topics .

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By considering the 25 creative college essay prompts above, you can be more prepared to write an engaging personal statement that will let your personality shine through and will help you to be.

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Nov 13,  · Updated, March 2, | We published an updated version of this list, “ Prompts for Narrative and Personal Writing,” as well as a companion piece, “ Prompts for Argumentative Writing.” Every school day since we’ve asked students a question based on an article in The New York Times. By considering the 25 creative college essay prompts above, you can be more prepared to write an engaging personal statement that will let your personality shine through and will help you to be accepted into the college of your choice.

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It happens that all students have to write an essay on the topic, chosen by the tutor. But sometimes, a teacher gives his students the freedom of choice and offers to write an essay on any subject that they want. An argument essay is an essay that seeks to persuade an audience to see the writer’s filefreevd.tk, an argumentative essay requires the student to investigate a topic, collect evidence, and evaluate evidence in order to clearly establish a point of view on the topic .